220V to 110v Roland


#1

Hello,

Purchased a Roland JV-1080 rack from France and it’s got 220v power. Read that Rolands can be an easy fix. Anyone familiar with this modification. Would I need any parts?

Thank you,


#2

It looks like a pretty easy situation - but I don’t have an actual JV-1080 here to look at, so if anyone can back this up with actual first-hand knowledge, that would be great!

Going solely from the service manual, the power transformer is listed as Universal, meaning that you don’t need to replace it for different mains voltages. Likewise, the power supply itself is the same for all versions, with the only difference being the AC input socket. (That means that you can just use a different power cord instead of having to change out the connector…) The only thing that is not clear to me is that it looks like there is a ‘jumper board’ as part of the power supply, so you may need to move (or solder) some jumpers to the correct locations there.


#3

Thank you Sam! would it help if I attached a picture of the power supply?


#4

Is it as simple as moving the black cable from 220v to 110v?


#5

Yes, I think it is that simple. But just to be sure, here’s how I would proceed…

Get a power cable that fits the AC socket, and has a 120V plug on it. Unsolder the black transformer wire, and move it to the 120V pin. Unplug the ribbon cables that feed the rest of the unit from the power supply - looking at the schematic, it looks like there are two of them (connectors CN404 and CN405). Then plug the power cord in, turn the unit on (careful not to electrocute yourself!), and then measure the output voltages from the power supply, on those disconnected ribbon cables or at the connectors.

The 6-pin CN405 should show carry +12VDC and -12VDC, and you can measure this between the ground pins (either of the middle 2 pins, pins 3 or 4) and the outside pins. Pin 1 should read +12VDC, pin 6 should read -12VDC. If you’re seeing that, you will be good to go.

If you want to check the other connector, you should see 5VDC between pins 4 and 8.

If all is well, hook up the two ribbon cables, and the JV-1080 should now come to life on 120V.


#6

Huge thanks…I have a friend with soldering skills that can help me through this process. I will update soon.


#7

DONE AND DONE…worked like a charm. THANK YOU FOR THE HELP!


#8

Excellent news! Congrats, and thanks for sharing the happy ending!